Voyage dans le temps et technologie

Plutôt qu’une comparaison stérile entre le 2015 de Retour vers le futur et la réalité, Tim Carmody analyse comment la technologie influe sur la pensée (et inversement) avec une analogie étonnante entre la cassette audio et le voyage dans le temps.

Back to the Future, Time Travel, and the Secret History of the 1980s — The Message — Medium

Il conclue aussi sur une note un peu nostalgique sur le côté fermé, physiquement et juridiquement, de la technologie actuelle.
(putain de smartphone)

I sometimes call this “the cassette era,” and sure enough, cassettes are everywhere. Marty has a Walkman, a camcorder, and an audition tape for his band; the Pinheads have recorded a demo even though they’ve never played in front of an audience.

As a material support for a medium, the cassette has certain advantages and disadvantages. It’s more portable and sturdy than reels or records, and it requires less user interaction or expertise. It requires very fine interactions of miniaturized technology, both mechanical and electronic, in the form of transistors, reading heads, and so forth. Magnetic tape can actually record information as digital or analog, so it’s curiously agnostic in that respect.

Cassettes can also be easily rewound or fast forward. It’s easy to synchronize and dub the contents of one cassette onto another. And users can easily erase or rerecord information over the same tape.

This has clear implications for how we think — and especially, how our predecessors thirty years ago thought—about time travel. It is no accident that many important time travel films, including the Terminator franchise, Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, and yes, the Back to the Future movies, appear at this time. In all three cases, time travel is accomplished with a technological mechanism that allows its users precise control of where they arrive in the timestream. (In earlier time travel stories, travellers slide down a river or awake from a dream, but in the 1980s, the H.G. Wells/Doctor Who conception of time travel through a technological device pretty definitively wins out.) And in all three cases, the goal of time travel is to save and/or rewrite events within a specific person’s lifetime, without which a future timeline will cease to exist.

Back to the Future, Time Travel, and the Secret History of the 1980s — The Message — Medium.